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Places

Take a Scandication in Sweden

There’s so much to explore in two of Sweden’s northern and southernmost cities you may need to skip the capital completely.

Malmö

​With its proximity to Copenhagen giving it an extra edge in terms of accessibility, Malmö, Sweden’s third largest city, has plenty to discover for the curious weekender looking beyond the more stereotypical destinations.

Photo: Joakim Lloyd Raboff

Turning Torso

Whether you would want to or not, you can’t ignore the Turning Torso tower when you’re in Malmö. And you shouldn’t either, the magnificent 190m-high edifice, designed by Spanish architect Santiago Calatrava is not only the tallest building in Scandinavia, it’s also one of its most stylish. The public observation deck is on floor 49, while floors 50–52 contain the reception, a private club and a restaurant.

Turning Torso

Lilla Varvsgatan 14, Malmö

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Photo: Shutterstock

On the ball

For some fun entertainment and one of the best brunches in town, head for Boulebar by Drottningsquare. Housed in beautiful yellow converted stables by the Drottningtorget square, you can combine the best of French food with a game of boules.

Boulebar

Drottningtorget 8, Malmö

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Åre (destination Östersund)

It may well be best known for being one of, if not the, best ski resort in Sweden, but there’s much more to do and see in Åre than just enjoy the snow and like many counterparts in the Alps it is becoming more and more popular as an all year around destination.

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Gushing praise – Tännforsen waterfall

Tännforsen, often called Sweden’s largest waterfall is a perfect excursion at any time of year. A tourist attraction since the 1800s, at its peak in the spring, some 400 cubic meters of water cascade almost 40 meters down to Lake Noren each second.

Tännforsen waterfall

Photo: Åregården

A good night’s sleep

If you’re after a traditional place to stay, but you like the flexibility of self-catering, Åre’s oldest lodging, Hotel Åregården fits the bill. Dating back to 1895, the place oozes old time character, while offering modern spa facilities and a stylish restaurant and bar for after-ski, or after-hike.

Hotel Åregården

Årevägen 81, Åre

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Keep on track – Åre Bergbana

From the historic Fröå Gruva copper mine to a classic funicular, Åre is full of curios from a bygone age. The latter, Åre Bergbana, is an 800-meter-long lift with a wagon on each end connected iron cable. Inaugurated in 1910 it runs from Åre Square to Hotel Fjällgården and is a pleasant step back in time in this fine modern resort.

Åre Bergbana

Årevägen 84, Åre

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